EAST RUTHERFORD, NEW JERSEY - DECEMBER 29: Derek Barnett #96 of the Philadelphia Eagles sacks Daniel Jones #8 of the New York Giants during the second half at MetLife Stadium on December 29, 2019 in East Rutherford, New Jersey.
(Photo by Steven Ryan/Getty Images)

There’s no sugarcoating it. Daniel Jones’ turnover woes and numerous mistakes are costing the New York Giants big time.

Ryan Honey

Every week we see turnovers. Every week we see missed opportunities through the air, more so in the most recent defeat at the hands of the Buccaneers.

And still, the issues aren’t fixed, resolved, or at least suppressed.

When will they be?

Daniel Jones‘ blunders are absolutely costing the New York Giants wins. They’re 1-7 at the halfway mark of the pandemic-impacted 2020 NFL season, sitting as the second-worst team in the league.

But looking at the scores of each matchup, you can easily tell the Giants carry the potential to be a successful football team.

The same ballclub that’s won just one matchup — a 20-19 victory over Washington in Week 6 — lost to the Bears by four, Rams by eight, Cowboys by three, Eagles by one, and on Monday night, the Tom Brady-led Bucs by two.

And in each of those losses, Jones turned the ball over at least once, combining for eight in the string of meetings.

If he was making these types of mistakes week in and week out and the Giants were losing by 20-30 points each and every time, you could pinpoint the defeats on the entire team. You could make the argument the coaching wasn’t strong enough, the defense didn’t hold its own, and the fight was simply nonexistent.

But that hasn’t been the case.

If Jones had limited the blunders and didn’t turn the ball over as consistently (or in a perfect world, at all), the Giants would have some of those killed possessions back. In turn, they could’ve then possibly scored points, and those one-possession losses could’ve thus turned into victories for this organization, wins that would be crucial in a struggling NFC East division.

You can’t say the defense hasn’t stepped up; it has. You can’t say the offensive line isn’t improving; it is. These losses come down to a few plays that could’ve gone differently and a few mistakes which proved costly — mistakes made by Big Blue’s second-year quarterback.

I understand the need to be patient with Jones. He’s young and developing, the offensive line still isn’t fantastic, Jason Garrett hasn’t been the most consistent play-caller, and there’s no significant talent on the offensive side of the ball amid Saquon Barkley’s season-ending ACL tear.

But what happened this past Monday night?

The offensive line at least played decent — likely the best game the unit has played all season with promising performances from either of the two rookies on the left side.

Jones still made costly mistakes.

Garrett finally schemed plays that led to his receivers finding space and actually utilized tight end Evan Engram correctly.

Jones still made costly mistakes.

Engram stepped up after his rough Week 7 performance and caught five balls for 61 yards.

Jones still made costly mistakes.

Football is the ultimate team game, and it’s tough to pinpoint any loss (or win, for that matter) on one single individual.

But the facts speak for themselves. So do the numbers and mishaps.

Daniel Jones has cost the New York Giants wins. Simple as that.

NYY

NYM

NYG

NYJ

NYK

BKN

NYR

NYI

NJD

SJU