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The New York Giants may handle their quarterback situation in 2019 similar to the way the Kansas City Chiefs handled theirs in 2017.

Jason Leach

There’s been much speculation surrounding how the New York Giants will handle their quarterback position in 2019.

The reason for the speculation is due to the uncertainty surrounding the franchise’s best quarterback, Eli Manning.

Manning turned 38 in January and is entering the final year of his contract in which he’s scheduled to make $23.2 million. Within that $23.2 million is a roster bonus of $5 million if Manning is on the roster March 17.

With the Giants having gone 8-24 over the last two seasons, along with a plethora of holes they need to fill on the roster, some feel it would be in the best interest long term interest of the franchise if they move on from Manning and draft a quarterback and start them in 2019.

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Under this scenario, the Giants would incur a $6.2 million hit in dead cap space, but they would free $17 million in cap space that would allow them to be more aggressive in free agency.

Another scenario the Giants can execute mimics what the Kansas City Chiefs did in 2017 by taking Patrick Mahomes in the first round of the draft only to sit him for a year behind the then 33-year-old Alex Smith.

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If the Giants were to select Dwayne Haskins, Kyler Murray, or any of the other quarterbacks coming out in this year’s draft with the sixth pick, nobody would expect them to throw 50 touchdowns and be named league MVP in the following season as Mahomes did this past season. But they would gain valuable experience learning how Manning acts on and off the field that they would help them lead the Giants in 2020 and beyond.

As a competitor, nobody looks forward to mentoring their eventual successor, but it’s part of the business. Manning knows this as well as anybody.

In Manning’s rookie 2004 season, the Giants brought in two-time league MVP, Super Bowl 34 MVP, and future Hall of Famer, Kurt Warner, to start and mentor the spry Manning.

Warner led the Giants to a 5-4 record including playoff contention with seven games remaining. Of course, Tom Coughlin and Giants ownership turned the reigns over to Manning because they knew how valuable playing experience ahead of Kurt Warner was.

It was the best-case scenario for the franchise.

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Manning struggled and eventually lost his first six starts before winning the season finale, 28-24, against the Dallas Cowboys.

Despite missing out on a possible playoff berth, having Warner mentor Manning for one season greatly benefited the organization. In 2005, Manning led the Giants to an 11-5 record and their first division title since 2000. Two years later, he won his first Super Bowl by defeating the undefeated New England Patriots in Super Bowl 42.


Manning is now a two-time Super Bowl champion while ranking top 10 all-time in touchdowns and yards and has established himself as a future Hall of Fame quarterback. Part of Manning’s success can be attributed to the year he had with Warner.

It’s time for Manning to return the favor.

Manning has been the epitome of class on and off the field and has never thrown any teammates under the bus. Not once has he crossed the line of even partial controversy. This is why the Giants locker room hasn’t been as chaotic as Manning’s 2004 draft classmate, Ben Roethlisberger, and the ongoing drama surrounding the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Remaining professional, especially during tough times, is something Manning can pass to a Dwayne Haskins or any quarterback the Giants may draft.

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Eli Manning’s contribution to the Giants organization doesn’t have to end with his playing days. He can pass his knowledge, work ethic, and professionalism to his successor who will help the New York Giants for years to come.

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