Because Murphy declined his qualifying offer, the Mets will receive draft pick compensation if he signs elsewhere.

When the Mets signed Michael Cuddyer last offseason, they had to forfeit their first round pick. If they decide to sign a player who costs them a top pick again this offseason, they at least will have a competitive balance pick between the first and second rounds of the draft to give them a little more flexibility.

Think about this: the Mets and Royals were the last two teams left standing when the Fall Classic began in October. They both had mid tier payrolls. Both teams successfully drafted and traded well to acquire young talent that fueled their respective postseason runs. This proves that the big spenders can’t buy success like they used to. In fact, 6 out of the top 10 teams (payroll wise) did not make the playoffs this past season.

Draft picks have more value than ever, so the compensation the Mets will receive for Murphy is significant in building for future sustainability.

So, does losing Daniel Murphy now seem all that bad?

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