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Oct 30, 2015; New York City, NY, USA; (EDITORS NOTE: multiple exposure) New York Mets starting pitcher Noah Syndergaard throws a pitch against the Kansas City Royals in the first inning in game three of the World Series at Citi Field. Mandatory Credit: Robert Deutsch-USA TODAY Sports

Like Madison Bumgarner in 2014, New York Mets flamethrower Noah Syndergaard has a shot at baseball legend status.

“If they have a problem with me throwing inside, then they can meet me 60-feet, six-inches away. I’ve got no problem with that.”

Noah Syndergaard

With that one single quote, coupled with his Game 3 performance in the New York Mets only World Series win last October, Noah Syndergaard became semi-legend.

His obvious yet unapologetic first high-and-tight pitch to Kansas City Royals leadoff batter Alcides Escobar paved the way for the Amazins on that chilly October night. It was the high point in short five-game series that ended up in favor fo the American League club.

After pitching stellar ball in 2016, showcasing a 2.60 ERA and a 5.07 K/BB ratio, Thor still holds the aura of semi-legend. Mets fans love the guy for many reasons other than he’s the last man standing from a stacked starting five heading into the season.

Enter his opponent tonight at Citi Field, Madison Bumgarner — the man who’s already firmly entrenched and dripping with legend status.

MadBum, as the kids love to call him, literally carried his San Francisco Giants on his back in 2014. Not only was he the first man in history to record a five-inning save in MLB Postseason history, but his numbers sparkled to the tune of just one run allowed in 21-innings.

With every grunt the lefty pitched, meant the world to every run the Giants scratched and clawed for in stealing the series from the high-flying Royals.

Syndergaard has yet to reach those heights.

But not reaching those heights just means there’s a world of opportunity ahead.

MadBum was 25-years old when he played the role of Superman two Octobers ago. Thor is 24-years old today. Bumgarner is equipped with enough nasty stuff to incredibly equal his dominating mound presence. Thor has nastier stuff to go along with the same type of dominant aura beaming from his 6’6” frame.

New York, a team that dealt with more adversity than any club has in recent memory, will most definitely need a superhuman effort from their Superhero personality at Citi Field on Wednesday night. The only issue is, there’s another superhuman breathing the same New York air in the other dugout.

Perhaps, most exciting isn’t the idea that these two stud hurlers possess talent almost matched in the big leagues today. It isn’t even the idea that the NL Wild Card Game could go scoreless into extra innings.

What’s so appealing about this matchup is the notion that it forces two immovable objects to collide with another in a do-or-die game — a contest that brings out the best in baseball, when every pitch, swing, signal, and breath matters to the fullest extent.

These guys are two immovable objects, quite simply, because their attitude and demeanor match their stuff. It’s the one aspect of October baseball that is worth paying the full price of admission for.

No. Noah Syndergaard has yet to take on full legend status. The Mets haven’t yet won the World Series and he’s still the new kid on the block. But tonight, at Citi Field in the NL Wild Card Game, he has a shot to take an incredible second step in joining this immortal pitching club.

The first step came in Game 3 of the 2015 World Series. In 2016, with Thor representing the lone dominant New York Mets starting pitcher, a world of opportunity awaits.

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