1. Babe Ruth (RF/P-Yankees)

  • 1914-35, Yankees, Red Sox, Braves
  • 3rd in HR (714)

One guy who didn’t have an issue capturing World Series Titles was Babe Ruth who claimed seven of them during his magnificent career.

Honestly, did you expect anybody else in the top spot?

What’s marvelous about Ruth is not just his numbers, it’s that he literally saved and changed the game of baseball.

It’s widely chronicled that after the 1919 Black Sox Scandal that Major League Baseball needed something. They needed a hero.

It’s just what they got in Ruth.

Sure, his career 714 home runs are impressive, And of course, his remarkable 60 home runs during the 1927 season were so outrageous that smart people decided to have scientists run tests on the body of The Great Bambino for super-human powers.

What makes this guy so special is two-fold.

One, he was actually one of the better pitchers of all-time as well. With the Boston Red Sox from 1914 through 1919 he won 89 games and pitched to a microscopic 2.19 ERA.

The other was how incredible the difference was between his individual power and the rest of baseball. He literally changed the landscape of baseball from the Dead-Ball era to another thing nobody had ever witnessed before.

It took years for the rest of the majors to catch up.

In 1920 Ruth hit 54 home runs. This was obviously a new MLB record that furthered the previous season record when he hit 27.

This number of 54 was more than any other AL team had combined and only the Phillies in the National League could claim more.

Let’s not forget the man also hit .342 for his career and still holds the MLB record in slugging percentage (.690) and on-base plus slugging percentage (1.164).